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Thoughts for Employers – Simple Observations 1 to 11

There’s been a lot of discussion around Employer Branding recently – with plenty of differing opinions, rules and approaches. So I’ve done some research (reading 5 chunky reports in the past few days), and drilled down to compile a few key points as a waffle-free introduction, in layman’s terms:

  1. There’s no getting past it – a strong employer brand is no longer a luxury, it’s a necessity. Without it, resourcing becomes an uphill struggle.
  2. There is a huge talent gap (more of a talent chasm) opening up across many industries. It’s already hit Oil & Gas. Yours might be next.
  3. If Social Media isn’t part of your brand strategy, it’s time to change your brand strategy.
  4. Many companies don’t seem to understand their own technology, or make the most of their websites.
  5. Candidates are harder to prise from their current roles than ever – unless it’s for a salary hike.
  6. Your HR team needs to get savvy with social media to support your recruitment objectives effectively.
  7. You must administer your content, and maximise your use of data to drive better results – web traffic, SEO and who clicks where and when.
  8. Your reputation as an employer is hugely important. It can take a long time to build it up – and one false move to destroy it.
  9. Does your website work on mobile devices? It’s catastrophic if it doesn’t
  10. Employee engagement is paramount. Don’t be afraid to ask what your people think – and use your people where you can for referrals.
  11. Have a clear social media policy, so all of your people know what they should and shouldn’t be doing.

 

This Post Has One Comment

  1. It was startling to hear at the recruitment expo in London last week that 75% of emails are now read on a mobile device.

    I think employers need to wake up to this fact and instead of thinking “I need to make my website work on mobiles” they need to think “Mobile-first” – i.e. Get it looking beautiful and fully functional on mobiles and consider the desktop web interface as a secondary consideration as that is what it truly has become.

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